Dentists say mandating COVID-19 tests for patients before procedures will ‘shut down’ dentistry

(Creative Commons photo by Allan Foster)

When Gov. Mike Dunleavy and state health officials said elective health care procedures could restart in a phased approach, many of Alaska’s dentists were hoping to take non-emergency patients again.

But they said a state mandate largely prevents that from happening. 

State officials said they want to work with the dentists, but point to federal guidelines that dentists are at very high risk of being exposed to the virus.

Find more stories about coronavirus and the economy in Alaska.

The mandate said patients must have a negative result of a test for the coronavirus within 48 hours of a procedure that generates aerosols — tiny, floating airborne particles that can carry the virus. Aerosols are produced by many dental tools, from drills to the ultrasonic scalers used to remove plaque.

Dr. David Nielson is the president of the Alaska Board of Dental Examiners, which licenses dentists. In a meeting with the state, he told state Chief Medical Officer Dr. Anne Zink that it’s a challenge for patients to get test results within 48 hours of an appointment.

“Basically, what that means is, in your view, dentistry is just shut down indefinitely,” Nielson told Zink.

“That’s not true. That’s not what I feel at all,” Zink said.

“Well, that’s what it says to most of us,” Nielson said.

Nielson said dentists can ensure that patients are safe without testing for the virus.

“We do believe that waiting for the availability of testing to ramp up to the levels that would be necessary will jeopardize the oral health of the public,” he said.  

Nielson also said dentists are already taking steps to practice safely and could start taking more patients if they didn’t have to follow the testing mandate. 

“Based on everything that we’re doing with all our, you know, really, really intense screening protocols and all the different PPE requirements and stuff like that, that we’re basically good to go, as long as we do all of the things that we’ve already recommended,” he said.

Zink said Alaska is among the first states to reopen non-urgent health care. She says the state’s testing capacity is increasing, and that other groups affected by the mandate are working to have patients tested. 

“We are seeing numerous groups, including surgeons, stand up ways to be able to get testing available,” she said. 

The state mandate is less restrictive than what’s currently recommended by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC said all non-urgent dental appointments should be postponed. The CDC is revising the recommendation, but it’s not clear when there will be new recommendations. 

The dental board would like to replace the mandate with guidelines that require that every patient be screened, including answering questions about their travel, symptoms and contacts before an appointment, as well as to be checked for whether they have a fever before an appointment. 

Zink noted a problem with relying on screening. 

“It’s increasingly challenging to identify COVID patients,” she said. “This is an incredibly sneaky disease that appears to be most contagious in the presymptomatic or early symptomatic people with symptoms that can look almost like anything else.”

The draft framework proposed by the dental board also differs from CDC recommendations on personal protective equipment. The CDC recommends both an N95 respirator and either goggles or a full face shield. The framework said that if goggles or face shields aren’t available, dentists should understand there is a higher risk for infection and should use their professional judgment. 

Dentists working to start seeing more patients say they already take precautions against infectious diseases. 

Dr. Paul Anderson of Timbercrest Dental in Delta Junction said it would be challenging to have timely tests done for patients who live far from an urban center. 

Anderson said dentists have been working to prevent the spread of infectious diseases since at least HIV/AIDS in the 1980s. 

“We’ve been following these protocols, and it just seems odd to me that all of a sudden the government feels that it’s necessary to add all of these additional regulations,” he said. 

Anderson said screening patients — including checking their temperatures — is a significant safety measure dentists can take.

Zink said the state is open to working with the dental board to revise the mandate, or to issue a new mandate specific to dentistry. It’s not clear if the issue can be resolved before Monday, when the state will begin allowing elective procedures under the mandate. 

This content was originally published here.

Myant partners with Canadian expert for dentistry PPE innovation

Myant Inc., a world leader in Textile Computing, has announced a partnership with Dr Natalie Archer DDS, a recognized Canadian dental expert, to collaboratively develop a new line of personal protective equipment (PPE) designed to address the extreme risks that dental professionals face as they reopen their practices to serve their communities.

The types of PPE under development include both washable textile masks intended for support staff in dental practices, and washable textile-based respirators that meet NIOSH N95 standards for dental professionals who work in critical proximity to patients.

Risks for dental professionals

Social distancing is one of the basic ways to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus, with health officials advising people to maintain distancing of two metres with others. With governments progressively reopening their economies and allowing businesses to begin serving their communities again, the challenge of maintaining two metre distancing will become a potential source of danger for both front-line workers and for those that they serve.

“This is especially true for people working in the dental industry whose work environment is literally at the potential source of infection: the mouths and noses of their patients,” Myant said in an article on its website. “An analysis conducted by Visual Capitalist, leveraging data from the Occupational Information Network, suggests that dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and dental administrative staff are among the professions and support staff at the highest risk of exposure to coronavirus. Their work requires close proximity / physical contact with others, and they are routinely exposed to potential sources of infectious diseases.”

“The public health risk is magnified when you consider the volume of patients coming in and out of a dental practice,” Myant adds. “Consider the contact tracing challenge if a single asymptomatic dental hygienist tests positive for COVID-19. That dental hygienist may work in a practice with two dentists, a billing coordinator, a receptionist, and perhaps three other dental hygienists who each see 100 patients a week (with each patient coming with a loved one in the waiting room). It is clear that dental professionals will need to be among the most vigilant in our communities when it comes to the adoption of effective PPE in order to protect themselves and society from a potential second-wave of the virus.”

Partnership to drive innovation in dental PPE

Recognizing this challenge Myant, the textile innovator that pivoted to innovation in PPE as a response to COVID-19, has partnered with one of Canada’s pre-eminent dental experts to design a line of PPE geared specifically to meet the challenges that dentists, other dental professionals and their staff will face, in the Post-COVID normal. Dr. Natalie Archer DDS was the youngest dentist ever elected to serve on the Board of the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario and served as the governing body’s Vice President between 2011 and 2012. As a recognized and trusted subject matter expert on dentistry-related topics, she is regularly asked to speak to the public in the Canadian media. Dr. Archer will be working closely with the Myant team, advising on the design and the certification process for a new line of PPE for dental professionals currently under development.

Reflecting on her motivations, Dr. Archer told Myant: “Dental professionals feel a tremendous responsibility to get back to serving their communities, but as both members and servants of the community, we must be safe and responsible for both patients and the people that treat them. Like other dental professionals, I am concerned about maintaining levels of PPE.”

“With disposable PPE I feel there will always be a concern of running out, the expense, uncertain quality, not to mention environmental concerns because of all of the waste. Also, there is a real problem with the discomfort that currently available PPE poses for dental professionals who typically work long shifts and whose work is physical. I am excited to be innovating with the team at Myant to address the real world clinical problems that we are facing now in dentistry by producing PPE that is protective, comfortable, and reusable, which will help all of us stay safe and allow us to do our jobs.”

The PPE for dental professionals will be designed and manufactured at Myant’s Toronto-based, 80,000 square foot facility which has the current capacity to produce 340,000 units of PPE a month. Plans are underway to expand that capacity to produce over one million units per month as communities across Canada and the United States start looking for ways to re-open in a safe and responsible manner.

 “This new development highlights the agility with which Myant is able to operate, rapidly integrating the domain expertise of our partners to unlock the potential behind our core textile design and commercialization capabilities,” said Myant Executive Vice President Ilaria Varoli. “Textiles are everywhere in our daily lives and we look forward to working with partners like Dr. Archer to make life better, easier, and safer for all people.”

Ilaria Varoli, EVP, Myant Inc.(c) Myant.Ilaria Varoli, EVP, Myant Inc.(c) Myant.

Further information

To stay up to date on Myant’s dental PPE developments, join the Myant PPE Dental Mailing List.

For consumers interested in purchasing non-dental PPE, please visit www.myantppe.ca.

For B2B inquiries about Myant’s non-dental PPE, please contact us at .

This content was originally published here.

The Oral-Systemic Connection & Our Broken Healthcare System – International Academy of Biological Dentistry and Medicine

Say Ahh, the world’s first documentary on oral health, takes a sobering look at the state of our national healthcare system. Despite being one of the wealthiest nations in the world, home to some of the most advanced medicine and technology, America is suffering from a drastic decline in the overall health of its citizens. …

This content was originally published here.

‘A medical necessity:’ With dentistry services limited during pandemic, at-home preventive care is key

MILWAUKEE — While dentists may be closed for preventive care, don’t put your toothbrushes down. Doctors say keeping your oral health is more important than ever for adults and children alike.

The spread of the coronavirus put an abrupt stop to our normal routine. Preventive visits to dentist offices were delayed, but unfortunately, that’s also when a lot of problems are detected.

Dr. Kevin Donly

“We’ve only been able to provide emergency care,” Dr. Kevin Donly, president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, said. “Oral health is actually a medical necessity.”

Because oral health is critical to overall health, Donly maintaining your child’s oral care routine is essential to preventing dental emergencies during the pandemic. Those emergencies are categorized in three ways.

“Trauma, where a kid bumps their tooth, falls down and cracks their tooth,” Donly said. “Second, infection. We’ve seen kids with facial cellulitis, this can be detrimental to their overall health, we really need to see those kids right away.

“The other one is pain. Sometimes they have really deep cavities that cause a lot of pain and they need to see the pediatric dentist right away and get care.”

Donly says with some offices reopening soon, new protocols will be taken to ensure everyone’s safety.

“First of all you, will be contacted a day before your appointment for a prescreening call,” said Donly. “They will ask about a child’s health, are they feeling well? Are they running a fever?”

There will be spaces in waiting rooms due to social distancing, and dental assistants, hygienists and dentists will all be wearing gowns, masks and face shields, Donly said.

Prevention is key with regular cleanings delayed. When it comes to prevention, Donly recommends brushing with a fluoridated toothpaste a couple of times a day, try to keep sugary drinks and snacks away, and check your kids’ teeth on a daily basis.

This content was originally published here.

Embracing the future of dentistry: Rendezvous Dental now offering Tele-dentistry

The future of medicine as we know it is evolving, whether we like it or not. You may have even heard the term “telemedicine” in recent talks about healthcare.

With the introduction of internet and technology, a world of possibilities could open up; from access to top medical professionals all over the world, to medical assessments conducted from the comfort of your home.

The ability to diagnose (and in some cases, treat) remotely are made possible. For obvious reasons, this new technology could have some positive implications for rural communities like ours.

As healthcare as we know it evolves, the same rings true for oral health. The dental field is adopting Tele-dentistry which involves “the exchange of clinical information and images over remote distances for dental consultation and treatment planning.” .

What does this mean for patients?
For you, the patient, this could mean access to better oral healthcare, online consultations, and in some cases lower costs. For example, you can now get a professional opinion from your dentist without taking time off work or pulling your kid out of school.

Here locally, Rendezvous Dental is embracing the future of dentistry.
Forward-thinking dentists, like Dr. Colton Crane at Rendezvous Dental are already using this cutting-edge technology to improve the patient experience.

Let’s try it!
Tele-dentistry with Rendezvous Dental is easy. Visit their website and follow the instructions. Fill out the online form, describe your concern in detail, and attach two images from different angles. For just $25, you can have a response from Dr. Crane within 2-3 hours (during business hours)!

In most cases this is enough for Crane to decide if your problem is cause for immediate concern or something that can wait until your next cleaning. In a pinch, antibiotics could be prescribed too. Should an x-ray or further exam be in order, Rendezvous Dental will apply your $25 as a credit.

This new service is currently available online at rendezvousdental.com/tele-dentistry. For more information, call Rendezvous Dental at  or stop by their office at 312 N 8th St. W. in Riverton.

This content was originally published here.

Using AI to improve dentistry, VideaHealth gets a $5.4 million polish

Florian Hillen, the chief executive officer of a new startup called VideaHealth, first started researching the problems with dentistry about three years ago.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard educated researcher had been doing research in machine learning and image recognition for years and wanted to apply that research in a field that desperately needed the technology.

Dentistry, while an unlikely initial target, proved to be a market that the young entrepreneur could really sink his teeth into.

“Everyone goes to the dentist [and] in the dentist’s office, x-rays are the major diagnostic tool,” Hillen says. “But there is a lack of standard quality in dentistry. If you go to three different dentists you might get three different opinions.”

With VideaHealth (and competitors like Pearl) the machine learning technologies the company has developed can introduce a standard of care across dental practices, say Hillen. That’s especially attractive as dental businesses become rolled up into large service provider plays in much of the U.S.

Screen Shot 2019 09 16 at 16.33.16 1

Image courtesy of VideaHealth

Dental practitioners also present a more receptive audience to the benefits of automation than some other medical health professionals (ahem… radiologists). Because dentists have more than one role in the clinic they can see enabling technologies like image recognition as something that will help their practices operate more efficiently rather than potentially put people out of a job.

“AI in radiology competes with the radiologist,” says Hillen. “In dentistry we support the dentist to detect diseases more reliably, more accurately, and earlier.”

The ability to see more patients and catch problems earlier without the need for more time consuming and invasive procedures for a dentist actually presents a better outcome for both practitioners and patients, Hillen says.

It’s been a year since Hillen launched the company and he’s already attracted investors including Zetta Venture Partners, Pillar and MIT’s Delta V, who invested in the company’s most recent $5.4 million seed financing.

Already the company has collaborations with dental clinics across the U.S. through partnerships with organizations like Heartland Dental, which operates over 950 clinics in the Midwest. The company has seven employees currently and will use its cash to hire broadly and for further research and development.

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Photo courtesy of VideaHealth

This content was originally published here.

How USC students deal with physical stress caused by dentistry

Minalie Jain had experienced pain before, but when she started to work in the simulation lab at USC, the shooting pain in her arm caught her attention.

The sim lab involves a lot of fine handwork, with students bent over molds of teeth. The intensity of the muscle contractions left Jain in stabbing and throbbing pain.

Fortunately for her, the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC and the university’s physical therapy program have teamed up to use physical therapy skills that can help dental students deal with the physical stress caused by dentistry. Jain now does physical therapy to help her in day-to-day work.

Physical stress: Ergonomics and body mechanics offer relief

Dental students had always had one lecture on ergonomics from a physical therapy professor, but when Kenneth Kim, instructor of clinical physical therapy, took over that lecture, he thought the schools could do more together.

“I felt like a lecture once a year wasn’t enough — especially because we were seeing so many dental students at the clinic,” he said. “Sometimes the students were getting pretty emotional because of all the pain.”

Kim worked with Jin-Ho Phark, associate professor of clinical dentistry, to set up the ergonomics and body mechanics collaboration after the lecture. This is the first year that physical therapy students go to the dental students’ sim lab once a week, for two hours in the morning and two hours in the afternoon. “We can follow up on body position and patient position, and they have been really receptive,” Kim said.

The biggest issues that dental students face are forces on their hands, necks and arms as they work on models of patients.

They sometimes forget to adjust the patient to make their own bodies work more easily.

Kenneth Kim

“They sometimes forget to adjust the patient to make their own bodies work more easily,” Kim said. “That means that students can stay hunched over, in that position for hours, which causes neck and back pain. We come in and make a small adjustment, which results in a huge outcome.”

Musculoskeletal disorders: a widespread problem

Dentists are particularly prone to musculoskeletal disorders: 70 percent of dentists suffer from them, compared to 12 percent of surgeons. That’s mainly because dentistry requires lots of repetitive motions, especially by the hand and wrist, as well as sustained postures, said Phark says, who explained that students in the sim lab work on mannequins, learning to use drills inside tooth models. The way they position their necks forward or slouch their backs can often result in lower back and shoulder pain.

“We see that throughout the years students in dental school don’t always take care of their posture while they perform procedures,” he said. That’s hard on a body, especially considering students are working in the same position for eight hours a day.

In addition to the lectures and hands-on help, students can often position themselves better by using their loupes, which allows them to maintain a certain distance from a patient.

“With lenses on the loupes, you can’t really adjust them so there is a working length in which they have to position themselves,” Phark said.

Sit for some patients and stand for others

Kenneth Gozali uses his loupes to remind himself to keep a good posture and position with patients. He focuses on sitting straight, having the right chair height and patient height — all of which make it easier to do his work.

“It was a little strange because I was not all that used to sitting all day, but now I like to switch it up: I’ll sit down for two or three patients and then stand up for the next ones,” he says, adding that in dentistry it’s all about keeping your hands and arms in good working order. “You can’t do much with a bad back or bad arm.”

Phark has used the collaboration as a refresher in his own work: He noticed there were days when he came home in pain.

“My back is hurting, my neck is hurting, I have to maintain a proper posture myself,” he said. “It’s not just preaching — we have to practice ourselves.”

Phark works on Wednesdays in the USC Dental Faculty Practice for 12 hours. “I basically cannot survive the day if I’m not sitting properly,” he said.

Two-way education

The dental students have been very receptive to the instruction and advice, since many of them experience a variety of issues that we can help them navigate and problem solve, whether it is pain, fatigue or difficulty visualizing target areas within the mouth, said Ashley Wallace, who has also learned things from the dental students

“I’ve learned the dentistry-specific language in regards to quadrants and tooth surfaces, and how the position of both the patient and dentist change depending on the target surface, procedure and tools required or whether direct or indirect vision is used.”

Wallace said it’s been valuable to adapt her training to a specific audience such as the dental students.

“My hope is that if they implement proper body mechanics now, they will have less need for physical therapy down the road.”

It takes three weeks to break a habit

Kim hopes to continue and expand the collaboration in the coming years. This year, physical therapy students are only working in the dental school for five weeks — and they are trying to figure out how to do more in the future.

“For the first year, five weeks is pretty good,” Kim said. “It takes three weeks to break a bad habit, like slouching or stooping. With our presence, we can get them to be more mindful about their posture going forward.”

Jain will continue to do physical therapy exercises, which she said are helping her pain. An X-ray showed calcified tendonitis in her rotator cuff, a genetic condition that was exacerbated by her dental school work. She’s grateful for the extra perspective and help she gained from the collaboration.

“Ergonomics is very crucial in dental school because forming a bad habit is really easy since it is very difficult seeing in the mouth,” she said. “It is important to keep the back straight and the arms in appropriate positioning so it doesn’t cause strain on it, even for people who do not have arm issues.”

This content was originally published here.

Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry Donates to Local Food Banks

Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry is working hard to do all they can to help those in need during the COVID-19 outbreak. Since the company’s founding over 19 years ago, the dental group has always given back to the communities they serve. This week and in weeks to come, the Riccobene staff will be teaming up with local food banks to help carry out their mission in providing food and support for those in need. Each of the 30+ Riccobene locations across North Carolina will be participating in this community initiative, donating non-perishable food items, including canned fruits and vegetables, cereal, peanut butter, juice boxes and other needed food items. 

The Riccobene team encourages allwho are able, to support their local food banks. With many schools and businesses shutting down to prevent the spread of COVID-19, thousands will be left without food. Smiles on Us, a community outreach program Riccobene Associates started to give back to local communities, is determined to take advantage of this opportunity to make a big impact. 

“We’re proud to participate in the community’s efforts to help children and families across North Carolina who are in need. It’s the right thing to do, and it’s who we are as a company,” says Whitney Suiter, Director of Marketing at Riccobene Associates.

To encourage donations, Riccobene Associates has provided a list of food banks across North Carolina. 

List of Local Food Banks

Raleigh

1924 Capital Boulevard, Raleigh, NC 27604

Wake Forest

149 E Holding Avenue, Wake Forest, NC 27587

Knightdale

111 N First Ave, Knightdale, NC 27545

Cary

187 High House Road, Cary, NC 27511

Apex

1600 Olive Chapel Road, Suite 408, Apex, NC 27502

Garner

209 S Robertson Street, Clayton, NC 27520

Clayton

Samaritan Shelf Food PantryWest Clayton Church of God // 143 Short Johnson Rd, Clayton, NC 27520

Selma

401 W Anderson St, Selma, NC 27576

Goldsboro

Community Soup Kitchen112 West Oak St. Goldsboro 27530 (no website) 919-731-3939

Greensboro

3210 Summit Avenue, Greensboro, Nc, 27405

Charlotte

500-B Spratt Street, Charlotte, NC 28206

Fayetteville

Hunger Can’t Wait406 Deep Creek Road, Fayetteville, NC 28312

Clemmons

2585 Old Glory Road, Suite 109, Clemmons, NC 27012

Benson

Deliverance Church- 103 E Main St, Benson, NC 27504

Rocky Mount

1725 Davis Street, Rocky Mount, NC 27803

Holly Ridge

12395 NC Hwy 50, Hampstead, NC 28443

Oxford

ACIM (Area Congregations In Ministry) – 634 Roxboro Rd, Oxford, NC 27565

Wilmington

1314 Marstellar Street, Wilmington, NC 28401

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Nicole ‘The Lip Doctor’ Bell redefining cosmetic dentistry

Long Island native Dr. Nicole Bell, also known as “The Lip Doctor,” has risen to success as a result of fusing dentistry and advanced esthetics.

After graduating from Baldwin Senior High School, Bell attended Manhattan College in Riverdale, New York, on a full academic scholarship. Her dental career began with studies at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, where she earned a doctor of dental surgery degree in 2001.

Currently, Bell shares two locations — in Long Island’s Freeport village and in downtown Brooklyn — where she is certified to treat with lasers and performs most procedures without the use of a drill or anesthetic. 

Rolling out had the opportunity to speak with Bell about her passion for cosmetic dentistry, what differentiates her practices, and her advice for entrepreneurs in the medical field.

When did you realize that you wanted to be a doctor?

When I was 5 years old I won a science fair, and after the competition, I was asked what I wanted to be when I grow up. I said, “I want to be a doctor.” Having my parents segue and guide me along the way made me feel like there was nothing to prevent me from becoming a doctor. The word doctor just stuck with me, and I continued to move forward. Medicine was intriguing but, more specifically, dentistry became appealing to me in college. I was heavily influenced by the dean of my dental school who is now the president of the dental school at Meharry Medical College.

Click continue to read more.

God, Fam, Biz, and Good Vibes. Writing about the things and people who matter that are making an impact in our community. Content Producer / Editor, entrepreneur and former Fortune 500 Sales and Marketing Executive.

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International Women’s Day: A Celebration of Women in Dentistry

Times have certainly changed since 1898, when Emma Gaudreau Casgrain became the first woman licensed to be a dentist in Canada. Today women are a growing force in the dental industry within Canada and beyond. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the number of women dentists in Canada rose from 16 percent in 1991 to 28 percent in 2001. By 2011, the proportion had grown to 29.5.

International Women’s Day is the ideal time to take a closer look at the role of women in the field of dentistry.

More Women Are Graduating With Dentistry Degrees

The number of women practicing dentistry in Canada should continue growing with women graduating with dentistry degrees than men. For example, in 2016, 34 women graduated from the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) dentistry schools for every 24 males. Many dentists estimate roughly half of their graduating class members were women.

Dr. Alison Fransen, a general dentist at Wesbrook Village Dental Centre who graduated from UBC in 1997, said she had a “great experience in dental school,” which gave her “lots to learn.”

Dr. Wise Tang, a general dentist at Burnaby’s Mega Dental Group, added her experience of going through dentistry school and finding employment was “Challenging, but very rewarding.”

Dr. Julia McKay and Dr. Carlos Quiñonez, in their article “The Feminization of Dentistry: Implications for the Profession” published in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, stated female dental students bring something different to the classroom than their male peers. Female students are more emotionally sensitive and expressive, qualities which help them socialize with other students and respond to the patients they see during internships and hands-on course components.

Women in Dentistry Have Prominent Female Figures to Inspire Them

More Women Are Graduating With Dentistry DegreesIn her 2006 Psychology of Women Quarterly article “Someone like me can be successful: Do college students need same-gender role models?,” Penelope Lockwood explained female students are significantly more influenced by a role model’s gender than male students.

Female students, she wrote, feel much more motivated when reading about a successful woman in their field than a successful man. When citing career role models, female students also tended to identify women they look up to, largely because they felt they may face similar industry challenges to the women that inspired them. It’s significant that as more women excel in dentistry, more women are inspired to follow in their footsteps.

Burnaby dentist Dr. Wise Tang says Dr. Karen Burgess, who she observed practice during her volunteer program, is one of her greatest inspirations. Dr. Burgess is a trailblazing oral pathologist who works closely with Dr. Jonathan Irish diagnosing and treating mouth cancers at Princess Margaret’s Dental Oncology, Ocular, and Maxillofacial Prosthetics Clinic. This clinic is the busiest of its kind in Canada, seeing 14,000 patients every year.

Vancouver dentist Dr. Alison Fransen still considers Dr. Marcia Boyd, the dean while Dr. Fransen studied at UBC Dentistry, one of her greatest career role models. An Order of Canada recipient, Dr. Boyd was the first Canadian woman to serve as the president of the American College of Dentists. She also led a task force on the future of organized dentistry in British Columbia for the province’s College of Dental Surgeons and was an organizer and speaker for the American Dental Education Association’s International Women’s Leadership Conference.

Female Dentists Are Providing a Different Experience for Patients

Female Dentists Tend to Work DifferentlyFor centuries, a trip to the dentist has been perceived as something to fear. However, as more women enter the field, that perception is slowly changing, according to McKay and Quiñonez. While most female dentists don’t think their professional experiences are any different from those of their male counterparts, studies show female dentists bring different traits and practices to their clinics.

Female dentists are said to be more empathetic and better able to communicate with their patients. They seem to be less rushed and willing to discuss their patients’ ailments and concerns in a more caring, humane way than male dentists. Just 8 percent of female dentists expect their patients to experience pain in the chair compared to 46 percent of male dentists. This suggests female dentists will often take greater care to reduce the pain their patients experience than male dentists.

Female Dentists Tend to Work Differently

Once dental practices were male-dominated spaces, but today female representation is at an all time high. In fact, one-third of the dentists at 123 Dentists are women. Female dentists can also bring a different kind of decision-making to any practice, according to self-reported research cited by McKay and Quiñonez. Men replied in a survey that they usually base their decisions on objectivity, logic, and consistency, while the women reported being more motivated by how they feel. Their personal values, sympathies, and desire to maintain harmony and tact are important factors in patient care.

Female Dentists Tend to Work DifferentlyThe personal qualities women typically possess see them spearheading unique dental programs like Ontario’s Project Restoring Smiles. The women behind this initiative provide free dental procedures to survivors of domestic violence who are self-conscious about what their abuse has done to their smiles. These dentists provides extensive procedures costing thousands, including orthodontics, bleaching, crowns and bridges, root canals, extractions, dental implants, and surgical facial reconstruction free of charge.

“Our vision is to restore confidence in women who have survived domestic violence by addressing the physical effects of abuse,” Dr. Tina Meisami explained in a statement cited by women’s blog SheKnows. “Restoring a woman’s smile has an incredibly powerful impact on her overall physical and mental health.”

Since launching in 2011, Project Restoring Smiles has treated more than 45 patients to more than $200,000 worth of complimentary dental services.

The different character traits female dentists exhibit, as seen in the team from Project Restoring Smiles, translate into the different approaches McKay and Quiñonez saw female and male dentists taking in clinical practice. They noted male dentists tend to use gloves, masks, and protective eyewear less frequently than female dentists, who reported being more concerned with infection control. Women also typically favour preventative measures, while male dentists are more likely to advocate significant restoration. The willingness that these women have to head off problems before they arise could have a significant impact on their patients and the entire dental industry, in fact.

Female dentists are also more likely to refer the patients to specialists rather than attempting to resolve patient problems themselves. McKay and Quiñonez stated 70.3 percent of female dentists have referred simple and complex surgical cases to specialists compared to just 49.5 percent of male dentists.

Female Dentists Come From Diverse Backgrounds

Female Dentists Come From Diverse BackgroundsVarious scientific studies acknowledge that diversity in any industry makes professionals more creative, more diligent, and more hard-working.

For that reason, the large number of female dental professionals that come from nations outside of North America is also notable.

Burnaby dentist Dr. Wise Tang hails from Hong Kong and offers her services in English, Mandarin, and Cantonese, and is the owner of two 123Dentist offices.

Dr. Roshanak Rahmanian received her Doctor of Dental Surgery in Iran before completing a two-year qualifying program at the University of Toronto to practice in Canada.

Today she works as a general dentist at the Lonsdale Dental Centre in North Vancouver.

Representation of Women in Dentistry Goes Beyond Dentists

Representation of Women in Dentistry Goes Beyond DentistsWhen assessing the impact of women in dentistry, it makes sense to analyze the number of practicing dentists. However, this doesn’t tell the entire story. Approximately 98 percent of Canada’s dental hygienists are women, along with 95 percent of its dental assistants. Both these roles feature in the top five female-dominated professions in Canada.

Women are also taking a growing role in leading dental practices. For example, 28 percent of 123Dentist clinic owners are women. Anecdotal evidence also suggests more women are specializing in dentistry.

While general dentistry remains popular, many female dentists say they see more of their peers pursuing roles in specialties like oral surgery and endodontics. Women like these continue to make strides in dental specialties and assert themselves in exciting new dental fields.

Dentistry Is Growing to Reflect What Women Want

Women in dentistry typically demand different things than their male colleagues. They often want time off to raise children and usually retire earlier. In his article “The 5 Most Dangerous Trends Facing Dentists and Their Families Today,” Evan Carmichael noted that male dentists typically work for 35 years, while female dentists usually work for 20 years in the profession. This statistic is bound to change since the ratio of women to men in the industry is continually changing, and will be interesting to observe over the coming decades.

Dentistry Is Growing to Reflect What Female Dentists WantAs more women take roles in dentistry, we are seeing dental practices create more flexible working environments that reflect the needs of women. The current crop of dentists encourages those of the future to continue striving for the working conditions and work-life balance they need to achieve success.

We surveyed a number of female dentists and below are some of their comments and advice for women considering becoming dentists.

“My advice for future women dentists would be to know yourself and how to manage the stress of being a perfectionist, which can be in the nature of those personalities that go into dentistry,” one respondent said. “It can be overwhelming to own a practice, and be a ‘perfect’ clinical dentist, ‘perfect’ employer, ‘perfect’ colleague, lifelong learner and ‘perfect’ mother and still juggle everything with the impossible standards we set for ourselves. We wear many hats.”

“Having a dental career while being a mom is tough,” another respondent said. “One should strive to balance her career and family life, but the drive is the influence one can give to each and every patient and it’s priceless.”

While juggling the demands of dentistry with home life can be challenging, our dentists are showing they can do it all with ease, all while bringing new elements and approaches to an established industry. Although this was once a male-dominated field, women and their successes have now become integral to dentistry in Canada and beyond.

So with all of that said, we’d like to wish you all a happy International Women’s Day!

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This content was originally published here.

‘So shocking:’ MU Dentistry student makes history as 1st African-American class president

MILWAUKEE — Dental tools in hand and teeth to work on is Chante Parker’s comfort zone. But being the first African-American class president for Marquette University’s School of Dentistry is still sinking in.

Chante Parker

“I’m the one that’s imprinting on history and it’s like, I never thought that,” said Parker.

Park has been class president since July of 2019 and serves as an ambassador for her class to create new initiatives for the dental school. She had no idea she’d be the first African-American to step into those shoes in the school’s 125 years of existence.

“I realize the magnitude of this opportunity, but it’s just so shocking to believe that it’s me,” Parker said.

Parker grew up in Atlanta and completed her undergraduate degree at The University of Miami, so she said moving to Milwaukee was a culture shock.

“It’s very segregated in where people live and where people thrive, and how the city runs itself,” said Parker. “I’m not used to that.”

Being hands-on helps Parker learn how to create beautiful smiles while she hopes to bring smiles to the community by setting an example.

“To help shift that dynamic and change the perspective and show that black people can do well, you can do anything that you want to do,” Parker said.

As Parker preps a crown, some might say she wears one herself as a catalyst for an inclusive community.

Marquette University School of Dentistry

“It made me feel like I had purpose in being here,” said Parker.

Parker will graduate in 2022. She hopes to open her own practice and offer free services to underprivileged communities.

This content was originally published here.

Hudson La Petite Dentistry surrenders license after investigation

HUDSON, Wis. — A former Hudson pediatric dentist was being investigated on accusations of unnecessarily pulling children’s teeth, billing fraud and overuse of laughing gas when he surrendered his license to practice last month.

Documents obtained through a public records request show Dr. Andy Mancini was being investigated in seven different cases by Wisconsin’s Department of Safety and Professional Services.

Andy Mancini
Andy Mancini

The alleged violations included engaging in practices that constitute a substantial danger to patients, according to records.

Cases investigated by the state agency resulted in criminal charges and a civil suit brought by the state for falsified Medicaid claims.

An attorney for Mancini, who lives in Woodbury, Minn., previously said he would not comment on legal matters involving his client. Mancini denied all allegations in a Wisconsin Dentistry Examining Board document outlining the permanent surrender of his license in Wisconsin.

Dozens of allegations

A 2016 memo from the state alleged 37 separate complaints, including multiple reports of unnecessary tooth extractions, billing problems, children being held down, “aggressive procedures” and a threat to a child.

Among the allegations outlined:

  • Patients were billed for treatments that weren’t performed.
  • A child was held down while “kicking, pinching and clawing to get out of the seat during an extraction procedure,” during an unnecessary extraction procedure that a parent was not allowed to sit in on.

A dentist from the Department of Human Services Office of the Inspector General conducted an audit — generated by patient complaints — that revealed:

  • Mancini used the sedative nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, at levels sometimes reaching a 70 percent concentration of nitrous oxide-to-oxygen, about double the recommended concentrations of 30-40 percent nitrous oxide for children.
  • Patient files included “grossly mislabeled” X-ray files. The audit noted that Mancini would take the same six X-rays each time he’d see a patient. Medicaid, the report notes, reimburses for up to six X-rays on any date of service.

In a November 2016 interview with investigators, Mancini denied performing unnecessary work, but admitted to the possibility of billing errors “due to the incompetence of previous staff.”

Mancini told investigators he allowed parents in the room while he’s performing exams, but discourages family from being present during procedures “because it can be distracting” and can lead to anxiety for patients.

Kirsten Reader, assistant deputy secretary of the Department of Safety and Professional Services, said Mancini voluntarily surrendered his license April 10. She said that happened during the investigations — the outcomes of which could have led to revocation of his license.

Parent complaints

The latest allegations didn’t surprise former La Petite client Rebecca Viebrock of Hudson

She said that after being initially impressed with La Petite’s kid-friendly atmosphere, she found herself having to return over and over.

“I practically lived at that place,” she said.

She grew skeptical, but she said her questions about X-rays and cavities were met with defensiveness from Mancini.

Viebrock said La Petite was one of the only dentists in the area that took state insurance. Without La Petite — where she also received dental care — Viebrock said she and her children are left without options in the area.

Stillwater resident Ashley Foley said she’s also in search of answers after learning about allegations of questionable care at La Petite. She said she took her children there for two years beginning in 2012 and never questioned the multiple tooth-pullings Mancini recommended.

Two of those involved her daughter’s front baby teeth, which have sat empty since the child was about 2. Foley said the girl is now 5 years old and must wait at least two more years before her adult teeth come in. Meanwhile, Foley said her daughter is in speech therapy and covers her mouth in shame when she smiles.

“What if this didn’t need to happen?” she said.

This content was originally published here.

The Real Truth About Dentistry – TeethRemoval.com

An intriguing long form piece appears in the May 2019 issue in Atlantic titled “The Truth About Dentistry: It’s much less scientific—and more prone to gratuitous procedures—than you may think,” written by Ferris Jabr, see https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/05/the-trouble-with-dentistry/586039/. This article has a lot of people talking including dentists, physicians, and patients who have experience with dentists throughout the Internet on forums and Twitter (see https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/forums/topic/the-truth-about-dentistry-critical-longform-piece-in-the-atlantic/). The main shortcoming with this article in the Atlantic is it relies on an anecdotal story which forms the basis of the entire article. There are several themes to the article that will be discussed below along with additional themes not mentioned that are involved to form the real truth about dentistry.

1. Dentistry is a Business and some Dentists, just like in other Professions, are Bad Apples.

The article describes a dentist Lund who overtreats patients by performing more expensive procedures that are not necessary in order for him to make more money and does this for many many years. Dentist Lund’s way of making extra money is by having patients with cavities receive root canals with incision and drainage when cavities are the proper treatment.

I had a brother inlaw that was a dentist. I mention how the dentist is always trying to sell me on something. He said to me “We are a business too”. That was all I needed to know…..

— Patrick Husting (@patrickhusting)

“Years ago, at a routine dental cleaning, the wife was diagnosed with 18 asymptomatic ‘small cavities’  that needed to be fixed. So we got a 2nd opinion, lo and behold, no cavities. Somebody apparently needed a new boat.” – portlandia via whitecoatinvestor.com

2. There is a Unique Power Dynamic in Dentistry that is Unlike Other Relationships

Many aspects of the dental experience have resemblances to torture experiences. When a dentist is standing over a patient inserting sharp instruments into their mouth they often feel powerless. Perhaps because of this the vast majority of patients who see a dentist do not get a second opinion from another dentist. This is unlike medical doctor visits where seeing a second doctor for another opinion is more commonplace. Furthermore the vast majority of patients are not reading medical and dental literature on their own and discussing it with their dentists if there were any disagreements.

dentist mouth - The Real Truth About Dentistry
This image is from Pixabay and has a PIxabay license

3. Dentists Have very Little Checks and Balances on Their Practice

The article presents a story of a young dentist Zeidler who buys the practice of of retiring dentist Lund who had overtreated patients for years. After several months Zeidler suspects there is a problem because he was only making 10 to 25% of the prior dentist Lund’s reported income. Zeidler also encounters many of the patients of the practice and notices a large number of them have had more extensive treatment performed than needed. Zeidler spends nine month’s pooring over Lund’s patient records. The records demonstrate vast amounts of overtreatment. Thus the overtreatment by the dentist went unchecked for many many years and it was not until the dentist retired and the patients and records were seen by someone else that the overtreatment was detected. Most dentists have individual private practices which is unlike medical doctors who usually work for a hospital or organization with more oversight.

4. There is Little Scientific Evidence to Back Dental Treatments

The article discusses oral health studies performed by Cochrane which is a well respected evidence based medicine organization that conducts systematic reviews. Nearly all of the studies performed in the field of dentistry by Cochrane have shown either: 1) there is no evidence that the treatment works or 2) there is not enough evidence to say one way or the other that the treatment works. What to do in regards to dealing with healthy asymptotic wisdom teeth is one of these treatments in dentistry where there is a lack of scientific evidence to support either preventative removal or watchful waiting.

5. Dentists are Paid Based on Treatment and Not Prevention which is being made Worse Due to Large Student Loans

The reality is if everyone had healthy teeth and no need for dental treatment besides occasional cleanings, exams, and x-rays dentists would not make much money. The pay structure for dentists rewards procedures and treatments. Dentists today graduate from school with a large amount of debt and they also want to buy an individual practice to run. This can lead them in debt of well over $500,000 which can push them to recommend treatments and procedures that are not really needed to try to pay this debt off.

6. There is a Lack of Focus on Quality Improvement due to a Culture of Cover-Up

Everyone can agree that patients want high quality care at an affordable price. However dentists are hesitant to make real strides towards quality improvement due to fear of being sued and increased liability insurance premiums. Human error can never be completely eradicated and human nature is not perfect. Humans have varying anatomy that can’t always be anticipated. Thus protocols should be in place for dealing with things such as sexual assault in the dental office and to address what one should do when the wrong tooth is extracted. Similarly protocols should be in place to best identify what to look for on panoramic radiography to determine if a wisdom tooth is at high risk of damaging a nerve and if cone beam computed tomography or coronectomy should be performed. Similarly protocols should be in place when a sharp or needlestick injury occurs in the dental office. In addition protocols should be in place for when a dental instrument breaks and is left in a patient during a procedure. It seems that dentists could be sharing data with each other about what goes on in their practice and they could be addressing sensitive issues instead of pretending that they don’t and won’t again occur.

This content was originally published here.

Everyday Superhero: Dr. Andrew V., Cosmetic Dentistry – My Jaanuu

We asked Dr. Andrew Vo – a dentist, spin instructor and Captain in the United States Army – for his best self care tips, even when life and work throw a lot at you.

Where are you from? Huntington Beach, CA

What is your favorite part about your job?

I love to change negative experiences a patient may have had into positive ones, building a long and lasting relationship with each and every one of my patients and using my profession to truly change lives for the better.

Why did you choose cosmetic dentistry?

I originally chose cosmetic dentistry because I wanted to help people smile, to help build more confidence, and to help patients live the life that is worth living. In addition to cosmetic dentistry, I also love working on pediatric patients. I decided to go back to school this June to specialize in pediatric dentistry. When I first started my journey in dentistry, I first worked with children and I miss working with them so much. I want to learn more about treating children, become an advocate for pediatric health, and create future mission trips with a foundation of knowledge.

What does self care mean to you?

Taking care of yourself both physically and mentally in order to take care of your loved ones.

You’ve got a lot going on, how do you practice self care?

Being in the fitness community (GritCycle and Equinox) and teaching indoor cycling for these companies, I am so blessed to have met such incredible people. Everyone has challenging days, but these two communities are filled with love, positivity and joy, which helps me practice self care.

Have you always known how to practice self care? If not, how did you find your balance?

I love food, and sometimes the foods that I consume aren’t the best choices. At one time in my life, I was overweight, unmotivated and depressed. I found my balance and changed my life when I found fitness and the people that inspired me to live a better and healthier life.

Why is it important for healthcare professionals to take time for self care?

We all get busy with our jobs and often times we make up excuses not to exercise because we don’t have time or to eat healthy because it takes too long. It is never too late to change, just take one step at a time and you will eventually get there.

How long have you been cycling? What made you decide to become an instructor?

I have been cycling for the past 12 years and decided to become an instructor because I wanted to make a difference and share my story. I wasn’t always in shape and healthy. It was when I hit rock bottom and had to make a choice to either keep going down the dirt road or be proactive and commit to living my best life. It wasn’t easy, but I got there. I love teaching indoor cycling to help people realize that they are loved, that they are accepted, and that it is NEVER too late to change for the better.

Hear more from our Everyday Superheroes here and here.

This content was originally published here.

Local music and art at Magic City Dentistry’s open house party on January 23

Sponsored

Magic City Dentistry
Photography by Ann Sydney Williamson on display at Magic City Dentistry (photo of photo by Nathan Watson)

Magic City Dentistry is launching their first party of 2020 with Botox specials, giveaways, Rock and Roll photography from Ann Sydney Williamson and a live music performance from Taylor Hollingsworth. The fun kicks off on January 23 at 4:30PM–you don’t want to miss it!

Part Dentistry, Part Art Gallery

Magic City Dentistry
Magic City Dentistry is conveniently located in the heart of downtown. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again–Magic City Dentistry has an atmosphere unlike any dentist office I’ve ever visited. For starters, every patient and employee is so friendly and outgoing. And there’s the fact that every examination room is outfitted with a TV–so you can catch up on your latest Netflix binge.

But my favorite part of visiting Magic City Dentistry is getting to see all of the art. In the past, Magic City Dentistry has displayed art from Lauren Strain, Sonia Summers, Eric Poland and many more. 

Magic City Dentistry’s Newest Exhibit

Magic City Dentistry
Photography by Ann Sydney Williamson on display at Magic City Dentistry. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now

The latest artist to grace the walls is Ann Sydney Williamson, a local photographer.

Ann Sydney has been a photographer for 7 years. It all started when she was touring with bands and decided to start taking photos with her phone. She noticed that she had a knack for capturing captivating moments, so she picked up a fancy camera and began to teach herself photography.

Ann Sydney took this photo of her husband, the drummer of Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires, in 2014. Photo via Ann Sydney Williamson

“I started only shooting bands, and then I starting taking photos of my travels. I really like odd cultural events, so I just starting taking photos of them.”

Ann Sydney Williamson

Since then, Ann Sydney expanded her photography to her travels, life and adventures. But for this art opening, she’s going back to her roots by showing off her best photos of the rock and roll shows she’s attended throughout the years.

  • View her work: Website | Facebook | Instagram

The Fun Starts January 23

Magic City Dentistry
Ann Sydney and her husband figure out the best way to hang her framed photos. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now
  • When: January 23, 4:30PM to 7PM
  • Where: Magic City Dentistry, 2117 1st Ave N, Birmingham, AL 35203
  • What: An art opening for Ann Sydney Williamson

Just like the opening of Sonia Summer’s exhibit in August, Magic City Dentistry is hosting a gala for the art opening. Here are the top 4 things I’m looking forward to!

1. Meet the Artist & Buy Her Work

Ann Sydney Williamson and her husband, Blake (the drummer for Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires) will be at the party to answer any questions you have about her art. Plus, during the gala (or any time you visit Magic City Dentistry), you can purchase any print or framed photo that you like.

  • Prints: $75
  • Framed photographs: $150

PS: If you see a print that you’d like framed, Ann Sydney can arrange to have it framed for you.

2. Eat, Drink and Socialize

This art gala is the perfect opportunity to make new friends in Birmingham. There will be food, wine and beer from Trimtab Brewing.

3. See a Free Show by Taylor Hollingsworth

Based on this photo, you can tell that Taylor’s music has psychedelic roots! Photo via Taylor Hollingsworth

While you enjoy Ann Sydney’s photographs, Birmingham native musician Taylor Hollingsworth will be putting on a free show! Taylor writes, plays, and records his own music, and has released nine solo albums. In addition to his solo work, Taylor has toured with Conor Oberst and the Mystic Valley Band, Dead Fingers, Maria Taylor, Monsieur Jeffrey Evans and his Southern Ace’s and 

“Taylor’s writing gets right to the heart. His music is a mix of psychedelic, punk and blues–but with an old country spin. I have personally seen people cry upon hearing some of his songs and I have too!”

Kristye Dixon, Practice Development Manager

4. Get Entered to Win Big

Ann Sydney took this photo of Henry “Gip” Gipson of Gip’s Place. Photo courtesy of Magic City Dentistry

Each guest gets an entry for several exciting raffle items, such as a free Teeth Whitening from Magic City Dentistry and a free framed photograph from Ann Sydney Williamson.

Plus, Magic City Dentistry is offering their botox units at a discount for one night only. At the gala, you can purchase botox for $10 per unit–regularly $13 per unit!

The best part? This entire event is FREE and open to the public.

  • Address: 2117 1st Ave N, Birmingham, AL 35203
  • Hours: 7AM-5PM Monday and Wednesday | 8AM-6PM Tuesday | 8AM-4PM Thursday | 8AM-1PM Friday
  • Contact: 205.238.6800 | Website | Facebook | Instagram

This art gala for Ann Sydney Williamson is the perfect chance to find out what Magic City Dentistry is all about. From celebrating and supporting local artists, to providing a warm, comfortable environment for their guests, you can get the full experience on January 23.

So come out and enjoy art, music, and good company at Magic City Dentistry.

Tag us on social media @bhamnow with your favorite photograph at Magic City Dentistry!

Sponsored by:

The post Local music and art at Magic City Dentistry’s open house party on January 23 appeared first on Bham Now.

This content was originally published here.

International dentistry program at USC marks a milestone

The Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC is celebrating a milestone.

Nearly 50 years ago, seven Cuban refugees were among the first class of students who graduated from the school’s international dentistry program.

Originally called the USC Special Student Program and later the International Student Program, the Advanced Standing Program for International Dentists (ASPID) was created in 1967 in response to the Cuban refugee crisis of the late ’50s and early ’60s when members of the professional class fled the country after Fidel Castro came into power. The United States government put out a call to schools to take in doctors and dentists to train them to practice here.

USC’s ASPID was the first program of its kind in the nation.

USC international dentistry: Diversity among students

These days, dentists from all over the world attend USC to acquire the skills taught in the United States.

“It’s well known that the U.S. has a very advanced dental education system, and oral health providers are very well trained in all specialty areas,” said Yang Chai, associate dean of research and an ASPID graduate, who came to the U.S. from China. “It is quite useful to be trained through the American system by attending a program like ASPID at USC.”

ASPID is a two-year program that begins with an intensive summer introduction to American dentistry. Afterward, students — who must have already completed National Dental Board Examination Part I to be accepted into the program — join their third-year colleagues in the regular DDS program. Following eight months of fundamental, technical and academic procedures training, their focus turns toward clinical training, where they begin working with patients in USC’s oral health clinics and community service programs.

“We get trained with the DDS students,” said ASPID student Amrita Chakraborty, who is from India. “I think that is a huge advantage for us because we get to learn a lot about the culture.”

Chai said ASPID’s diversity is an added bonus.

We not only learned from the professors at USC, but we also learned from our classmates. That was a really fun part of the program.

Amrita Chakraborty

“It’s a group of individuals who bring their unique backgrounds into the program,” he said. “We not only learned from the professors at USC, but we also learned from our classmates. That was a really fun part of the program.”

Melika Haghighi said her favorite procedure so far is learning about digital dentures, but one ASPID class in particular made a special impact.

“Cultural sensitivity was an amazing course,” she said. “There were lectures that made me cry, and they emphasized the importance of understanding different cultures. USC provides an environment that makes everyone comfortable.”

From Dubai to L.A.: USC international dentistry

Haghighi was born and raised in Iran, but she studied dentistry in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. After graduation, she practiced for a year but felt her environment was too limiting. So she started researching different countries to see how to take her skills to the next level. She moved to the United States and started volunteering at USC’s mobile clinic and the John Wesley Community Health dental clinic on Skid Row, which validated her decision to apply to ASPID.

“My experience working on Skid Row was amazing,” she said. “I witnessed the impact USC has on oral health and the community. I chose USC because, to me, it’s more satisfying to have that influential effect on the community rather than in private practice. I saw that USC would prepare me for that.”

USC international dentistry addresses cultural challenges

The challenges international dentists face in the United States are not only cultural. Since every country practices dentistry differently, dentists who want to earn a DDS need to learn all aspects of standard care.

“They need to learn the material,” said Eddie Sheh, an ASPID graduate and its current director. “They need to know the rules and the language. Everything. Just like if you are a doctor, and you want to practice in the U.S., you need to know how we do things.”

Sheh, who was a dentist in Taiwan, said his schooling was very different than the hands-on training USC provides to it students.

“USC is very strong in practicing how to do it in a simulation lab and then treating many, many patients until you graduate,” he said. “Not many other schools in other parts of the world are like that.”

In many countries, dental school starts right after high school and is a six-year program. In Taiwan, when Sheh was studying, fifth-year students were allowed to go to the hospital and observe faculty perform procedures.

“If you were lucky, you got to step in and do a few procedures. If not, you just watched,” Sheh said. “You might be doing a lot of pediatric dentistry because they’re busy, and they need your help. Or you’d just be watching someone do a crown preparation, and you didn’t get to touch it. In my case, I never actually completed a crown preparation or a denture. I just watched.”

What USC does is simply everything, according to Sheh. Students get clinical training in which they are actually treating multiple patients with differing procedures until they are perfected.

“You get to practice what you are trained in,” he said. “You know exactly what to do.”

Aiming for perfection

Chakraborty noted two chief differences between her schooling in India and with ASPID.

“No. 1, you are trained to become a perfectionist,” she said. “USC teaches you to not do work that is just passable. They teach you to strive to do really good work. Another would be professionalism — how to approach patients, how to explain treatments and basically how to treat a patient.”

Treatment planning is the major emphasis of the program, Chai said, and students spend a lot of time learning how to provide a comprehensive treatment plan for patients along with doing procedures.

ASPID accepts 34 students each year out of the more than 1,000 who apply. The ASPID Class of 2020 is 67 percent female; 63 percent of the class are international students requiring a student visa, 29 percent are U.S. citizens and 8 percent are permanent U.S. residents. One hundred percent of the class has earned a foreign bachelor of dental surgery, doctor of dental surgery or doctor of dental medicine degree.

Stay or go home?

Another obstacle international dentists face when they come here is the feeling of starting from square one. After completing years of schooling and practicing dentistry in their countries, often the only jobs they can secure in the United States at first is as dental assistants.

“You graduate from your own country, and you are called a doctor,” Haghighi said. “Then you come here and you have to repeat everything.”

As an ASPID alumnus, Sheh understands what the students go through.

“I understand what they have to endure. That’s the good thing — they know I graduated from the program, and I can tell them what to expect when they complete it.”

The majority of ASPID alumni stay stateside, Sheh said: “That is why they come here. Unless they have other reasons to go back, like for their parents, I would say 99 percent stay here. That was what the program was designed for.”

Whether students stay here or return to their countries, the training they receive with ASPID is unrivaled.

“USC has such a long history and very strong reputation in the community as one of the leading institutions for educating future dentists,” Chai said. “And, naturally, everyone who wants to learn how to practice the best dentistry possible will come to USC.”

This content was originally published here.

Sedation Dentistry Options For Children – from 123Dentist

Types of Sedation

There are several levels of sedation your dentist may choose to use depending on your child and the procedure to be undertaken.

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas, is the lowest level of sedation. It is blended with oxygen and administered through a small breathing mask. It is non-invasive, and once your child stops breathing nitrous oxide then the drug will quickly leave their system, and they will return to normal. Nitrous oxide won’t put your child to sleep, but it will help them to relax.

Mild sedation is usually induced using orally administered drugs. Your child will remain awake and usually be able to respond normally to verbal communication, but their movement and coordination may be affected. Respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes and functions are not affected at all, so there is no need for any additional monitoring equipment or oxygen.

Moderate sedation will make your child drowsy, and although they will usually respond to verbal communication they may not be able to speak coherently. They are likely to remain a little sleepy after the procedure, and most children cannot remember all or any of the procedure. This type of sedation can be reversed easily and breathing and cardiovascular function are generally unaffected.

Deep sedation is induced using intravenous drugs and will mean that your child is fully asleep. They may move a little and make sounds in response to repeated stimulation or any pain, but they will be in a deep sleep. Recovery from this type of sedation takes a little longer, and it is highly unlikely that your child will remember anything that happened. Sometimes respiratory or cardiovascular function can be impaired using these types of drugs, so there will be an extra qualified person present to monitor your child throughout the procedure.

The deepest option is a general anaesthetic, also induced using intravenous drugs. During a general anaesthetic, your child will be completely asleep and unable to respond to any stimulation, including pain. Your child will not remember any of the procedure, and should remain drowsy for some time afterwards. During this type of sedation, your child would be monitored by an anaesthetist who is trained in taking care of people under general anaesthetic. Recovery time is a little longer after a general anaesthetic than the other sedation types, and your child may need assistance with breathing during the procedure.

When Is Sedation Required?

There are a few reasons why sedation might be necessary for your child during a dental procedure. First of all, the procedure may be painful, so sedation would be appropriate to avoid unnecessary discomfort. Depending on the type and length of the procedure required, any of the above types of sedation might be appropriate.

If your child is at all anxious about visiting the dentist, it is important to make their experience as smooth as possible to avoid worsening the problem. The level of sedation required will depend on the level of anxiety and the procedure. For mild anxiety, nitrous oxide or mild sedation would help your child relax. If your child is very young, then a higher level might be appropriate to prevent them from moving during the procedure. In more extreme cases of anxiety or phobia, higher sedation levels may be required.

Sedation is sometimes required for children with behavioural disorders or other special needs. It can be difficult, or impossible, to explain to these children why dental care is required. The whole experience can therefore be very frightening for them, so an appropriate level of sedation may be used to help them remain calm and still for the procedure.

Concerns and Contraindications

Sedation has been used in dentistry for a long time, and the drugs and methods used are constantly reviewed. Anyone recommending or administering sedation is specially trained to do so safely, and during deep sedation and general anaesthetic your child is monitored by a trained professional in the room solely for that purpose.

Sometimes sedation can result in side effects such as nausea, vomiting, prolonged drowsiness, and imbalance. These effects usually wear off by themselves. After a deep sedation or general anaesthetic your child should be closely supervised to prevent falling, choking if they vomit, or airway obstruction.

Sedation of children for dental procedures is a common and safe practice. It may be worrying when your dentist first suggests it, but it is important not to increase your child’s anxiety so that they can maintain excellent dental care throughout their lives.

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This content was originally published here.

Mertz Family Dentistry

Prominent Longmont family dentistry relocates and updates facilities

Everyone knows those semi-annual trips to the dentist are crucial to preserving and perfecting your smile…but something to smile about? If you’re one of the many loyal patients with Mertz Family Dentistry, it’s not out of the question that you may actually look forward to your dental visits. That sort of anticipation tends to happen when those whose services you consult provide ongoing attentive care; they become practically family. What’s more, the team at Mertz Family Dentistry are truly invested in making your experience as enjoyable as possible. This goal has just gotten all the easier to accomplish, thanks to a new, brighter, airier, more spacious setting; one which they plan to show off at an upcoming Open House from 4 – 7 p.m. on June 15.

Formerly located on Terry Street, Mertz Family Dentistry recently made the move to 1325 Dry Creek Drive, Suite 304. The new, modern facility offers twice as much space, allowing the team to optimize their capacity to provide superior care to an expanded number of patients. It offers a few new perks in comfort, too, featuring heated massage chairs with patient-operated remotes and sunlit rooms that lend a spa-like feel not typically associated with the dentist’s chair. “Our previous location was a great facility from which to provide excellent dental care in the past,” Dr. Peter Mertz says. “But looking into the future, we couldn’t be more excited about the new location and its capacity to further service our community well into the next decades. I wanted to create a facility that gave us a platform to provide the best in dental care while utilizing the latest, most up-to-date, technology. It’s a very modern, bright, relaxing setting. It’s inviting.”

Founded in 1985 by Dr. Guy Mertz, Mertz Family Dentistry is family-focused and family-rooted. In 2000, Dr. Peter Mertz joined his uncle in the mission to provide the best, most comprehensive and technologically advanced dental health care possible. Dr. Brett Nelson, who is now approaching his one-year anniversary with the practice since joining the team, says the close-knit staff of 16 is like family. “The long-term staff really distinguishes this amazing practice,” says Dr. Guy Mertz.

High-tech and high-service meet at the new Mertz Family Dentistry location to provide patients with an overall pleasant experience.

“Everyone is very dedicated. We have several employees who have been here 20, 30 years.”

Dr. Peter Mertz, who now owns the practice, has been selected as a top dentist for more than a decade consecutively, recently receiving that designation for the 11th time this year. He has advanced implant, sedation, CEREC single-visit crowns, and the most up-to-date Solea® laser systems training available.

Dr. Guy Mertz began his esteemed career 33 years ago with the opening of his practice, and is dedicated to the Longmont community. He has extensive training in laser dentistry systems. Dr. Guy Mertz was also selected as a top dentist by 5280 Magazine for the past two years.

A second-generation dentist originally from Indiana, Dr. Brett Nelson is a member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, American Association of Endodontists, Academy of General Dentistry, American Academy of Implant Dentistry, and is a certified Invisalign provider. He is further certified in sedation dentistry. Dr. Nelson takes great care to practice what he refers to as ‘golden rule’ dentistry. “I treat all patients exactly as I would treat my closest friends and family members,” he says.

Prioritizing a personalized approach, doctors and staff at Mertz Family Dentistry take time to genuinely listen and understand the needs of each patient. And, the team does all they can to ensure they are equipped to meet those needs. They are highly skilled in pediatric dental care, and sensitive to the importance and personal means of helping children develop a positive relationship with healthy dental hygiene.

Throughout all ages and stages of life, Mertz Family Dentistry is invested in the wellbeing of its patients. “We’ve watched children grow up, go to college, and start their own families,” says Dr. Guy Mertz. “We have a great staff. We all enjoy each other, and we love our patients.” Dr. Peter Mertz attributes the notable, steady increase in patients the practice serves in great part to the warmth and dedication of his team. “We believe our staff is a big reason that our patients want to come back,” he says. “They each bring a high level of caring to their work.”

Bright new spaces have a spa-like feel, emphasizing relaxation and comfort for patients.

Alongside caring and understanding, Mertz Family Dentistry offers exceptional expertise. The wide range of services goes well beyond standard offerings, including sedation dentistry, Invisalign, and Laser Dentistry. Mertz’ cosmetic dentistry includes teeth whitening, porcelain veneers and crowns. Botox and Juvederm treatments are also performed on site. What’s more, all procedures are provided as comfortably as possible.

Mertz Family Dentistry has always been committed to investing in state-of-the-art, best practice technologies that provide the ultimate in dental care for patients. In fact, Dr. Peter Mertz is one of only a very few general dentists in the area to use a surgical microscope during dental procedures. “You can’t treat what you can’t see,” Dr. Peter Mertz says, stressing the significance of this technology. “The surgical microscope ensures the greatest accuracy possible.”

At Mertz Family Dentistry, three-dimensional X-rays provide the most thorough, comprehensive information for complex dental procedures. Such technologies further increase efficiency and ease for patients. “Utilizing our three-dimensional x-ray and scanner, we can have a guide fabricated for implants before the patient is even here, allowing for minimally invasive procedures,” Dr. Nelson says, explaining a few of the many benefits.

Mertz Family Dentistry was the first in Longmont to offer a special technology, which debuted 15 years ago- an advanced system that can create a crown or set of veneers in just a matter of hours. Each step is completed right in the office for same day fittings. Mertz Family Dentistry uses a detailed camera to map and measure the contours of the tooth. The remaining specifications are added into a chair-side computer, and the new piece is milled to tight specifications, increasing capability to closely match the new surface to surrounding teeth.

Skilled, caring professionals, cutting-edge technology, and a wide range of services offered-what more could one hope for in a dental office? How about painless visits? At Mertz Family Dentistry, the use of in-office lasers allows for anesthesia-free fillings, as well as other procedures to be completed without the use of shots. For all patients, and the youngest in particular, this is significantly reassuring.

Why not check out Mertz Family Dentistry for yourself? Stop by the new office at 1325 Dry Creek Drive on Friday, June 15, from 4- 7 p.m. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, wine, and the opportunity to visit with staff and tour the office. “We would love to extend an invitation to our whole community to join us, see the new space, and celebrate our grand opening with us,” Dr. Peter Mertz invites. “Come on by.”

This content was originally published here.

UNHCR - Turkey scholarship lets star Syrian student pursue dentistry dream

Since she arrived in Turkey six years ago, Syrian refugee Sidra has mastered a new language, worked in a factory to support her family and graduated top of her year in high school.

Her breakthrough came when she won a university scholarship. She is now in her second year of a dentistry degree, and fulfilling a life-long dream

“I am very passionate about education,” said the 21-year-old, who fled war-ravaged Aleppo with her family in 2013. “My dream was to go to university, and I studied very hard to achieve this dream.”

Her achievement reflects a single-minded determination to continue her education, even when it seemed she might not get the chance. She missed her final year of high school in Aleppo when fighting forced the closure of local schools, and when she first arrived in Turkey, she lacked the paperwork needed to enroll.

“The day I went back to school was beautiful.”

Unable to study, she took a full-time job packaging goods in a medical supplies factory while teaching herself Turkish in her time off from books and YouTube videos. A year later, when she secured the refugee documentation needed to resume her education, she vowed to make the most of it.

“The day I went back to school was beautiful,” she said. “The worst thing about war is that it destroys children’s futures,” she continued. “If children don’t continue their education, they won’t be able to give back to society.”

After graduating from high school top of her class with an overall mark of 98 per cent, Sidra then went one better to score 99 per cent in her university entrance exams. The results helped her to secure a vital scholarship from the Presidency for Turks Abroad and Related Communities (YTB).

While tuition fees at Turkish state universities have been waived for Syrian students, the scholarship provides Sidra with monthly support, enabling her to concentrate on her studies. Without this support she says she would not have been able to study her preferred subject of dentistry due to the extra cost of buying equipment such as cosmetic teeth to practice her skills.

Sidra practices her dentistry skills at home while her younger sister Isra looks on. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Sidra attends a practical lesson at Istanbul University, where she is studying dentistry. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Sidra stands outside her home in Canda Sok on the outskirts of Istanbul. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Sidra spends time with a friend on the historical Galata Bridge in Istanbul. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Once a week, Sidra teaches classical Arabic to Malak, an 8-year-old Turkish girl, at her home in Istanbul. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez

“Without the scholarship, I would have had to choose a different major, different to dentistry, and to work to cover my university expenses,” she explained.

Sidra is one of around 33,000 Syrian refugee students currently attending university in Turkey. The country is host to 3.68 million registered Syrian refugees, making it the largest refugee hosting country in the world.

Since the beginning of the Syria crisis, YTB has provided 5,341 scholarships to Syrian university students, while a further 2,284 have received scholarships from humanitarian partners. This includes more than 820 scholarships provided by UNHCR – the UN Refugee Agency – under its DAFI programme.

Access to education is crucial to the self-reliance of refugees. It is also central to the development of the communities that have welcomed them, and the prosperity of their own countries once conditions are in place to allow them to return home.

Enrolment rates in education among refugees currently lag far behind the global average, and the gap increases with age. At secondary school level, only 24 per cent of refugee children are currently enrolled compared with 84 per cent of children globally, with the figure dropping to just 3 per cent in higher education compared with a worldwide average of 37 per cent.

In Turkey, this average has been raised to close to 6 per cent thanks to the priority attached to education, including higher education for refugees.

Efforts to boost access and funding for refugees in quality education will be one of the topics of discussion at the Global Refugee Forum, a high-level event to be held in Geneva from 17-18 December.

Turkey is a co-convenor of the event, which will bring together governments, international organizations, local authorities, civil society, the private sector, host community members and refugees themselves. The event will look at ways of easing the burden of hosting refugees on local communities, boosting refugee self-help and reliance, and increasing opportunities for resettlement.

“Successful people can support the country they’re living in.”

Sidra is convinced that education holds the key to her own future success, and is determined to live up to the nickname she has earned among her fellow students.

“People call me ‘çalışkan kız’ which means: ‘the girl who studies a lot’,” she explained. “With education we can fight war, unemployment and illiteracy. With education we can reach all our goals in life.”

“Successful people can support the country they’re living in,” she continued. “Turkey has given me a lot of facilities, and it honors me that one day I can give back to its people and be an active member [of society], to work and practice dentistry with their support. I take pride in this.”

This content was originally published here.

Sedation Dentistry Options For Children

Children can often be apprehensive about dental treatment, but keeping oral health in good condition is important, especially at a young age. In certain situations, your dentist might recommend using a type of sedation during your child’s treatment. This can be a worrying concept, but the right information will help to put your mind at rest.

Types of Sedation

There are several levels of sedation your dentist may choose to use depending on your child and the procedure to be undertaken.

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas, is the lowest level of sedation. It is blended with oxygen and administered through a small breathing mask. It is non-invasive, and once your child stops breathing nitrous oxide then the drug will quickly leave their system, and they will return to normal. Nitrous oxide won’t put your child to sleep, but it will help them to relax.

Mild sedation is usually induced using orally administered drugs. Your child will remain awake and usually be able to respond normally to verbal communication, but their movement and coordination may be affected. Respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes and functions are not affected at all, so there is no need for any additional monitoring equipment or oxygen.

Moderate sedation will make your child drowsy, and although they will usually respond to verbal communication they may not be able to speak coherently. They are likely to remain a little sleepy after the procedure, and most children cannot remember all or any of the procedure. This type of sedation can be reversed easily and breathing and cardiovascular function are generally unaffected.

Deep sedation is induced using intravenous drugs and will mean that your child is fully asleep. They may move a little and make sounds in response to repeated stimulation or any pain, but they will be in a deep sleep. Recovery from this type of sedation takes a little longer, and it is highly unlikely that your child will remember anything that happened. Sometimes respiratory or cardiovascular function can be impaired using these types of drugs, so there will be an extra qualified person present to monitor your child throughout the procedure.

The deepest option is a general anaesthetic, also induced using intravenous drugs. During a general anaesthetic, your child will be completely asleep and unable to respond to any stimulation, including pain. Your child will not remember any of the procedure, and should remain drowsy for some time afterwards. During this type of sedation, your child would be monitored by an anaesthetist who is trained in taking care of people under general anaesthetic. Recovery time is a little longer after a general anaesthetic than the other sedation types, and your child may need assistance with breathing during the procedure.

When Is Sedation Required?

There are a few reasons why sedation might be necessary for your child during a dental procedure. First of all, the procedure may be painful, so sedation would be appropriate to avoid unnecessary discomfort. Depending on the type and length of the procedure required, any of the above types of sedation might be appropriate.

If your child is at all anxious about visiting the dentist, it is important to make their experience as smooth as possible to avoid worsening the problem. The level of sedation required will depend on the level of anxiety and the procedure. For mild anxiety, nitrous oxide or mild sedation would help your child relax. If your child is very young, then a higher level might be appropriate to prevent them from moving during the procedure. In more extreme cases of anxiety or phobia, higher sedation levels may be required.

Sedation is sometimes required for children with behavioural disorders or other special needs. It can be difficult, or impossible, to explain to these children why dental care is required. The whole experience can therefore be very frightening for them, so an appropriate level of sedation may be used to help them remain calm and still for the procedure.

Concerns and Contraindications

Sedation has been used in dentistry for a long time, and the drugs and methods used are constantly reviewed. Anyone recommending or administering sedation is specially trained to do so safely, and during deep sedation and general anaesthetic your child is monitored by a trained professional in the room solely for that purpose.

Sometimes sedation can result in side effects such as nausea, vomiting, prolonged drowsiness, and imbalance. These effects usually wear off by themselves. After a deep sedation or general anaesthetic your child should be closely supervised to prevent falling, choking if they vomit, or airway obstruction.

Sedation of children for dental procedures is a common and safe practice. It may be worrying when your dentist first suggests it, but it is important not to increase your child’s anxiety so that they can maintain excellent dental care throughout their lives.

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Children’s Health
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This content was originally published here.

From Ancient Egypt to the Nazis: 16 Horrors of Dentistry Through the Centuries

Early man didn’t really have any tooth worries. Not only did the people in pre-agricultural societies not have any sugar or processed foods to worry about, the life expectancy was so low that you were often dead before tooth rot set in anyway. However, when mankind started to learn how to farm, tooth decay started getting real. Indeed, archaeologists have found evidence that people living more than 15,000 years ago were suffering from cavities. What’s more, they were also using flints to clean their teeth and to even knock rotting teeth out.

Shockingly, such primitive dentistry was to remain the norm for many centuries. While the people of ancient Egypt, Rome or Greece might have been pioneers in many fields, including maths, astronomy and even medicine, their knowledge of oral health was basic to say the least. And this approach to dental health continued right through the Middle Ages. In fact, it was only really with the Enlightenment that real, expert dentists started to emerge. But even then, treatments were carried out without any anaesthetics.

The history of dentistry, therefore, makes for some pretty tough reading. Going to the dentist could be bloody, gory, painful and often even fatal, as the below shows. So, here we present the history of dentistry, blood and all:

Simple bow drills were used to fix cavities more than 9,000 years ago. Ttamil.com.

Bow drills were used 9,000 years ago

Fear of the dentist’s drill is not a new phenomenon. In fact, archaeologists have discovered evidence that humans were facing the trauma of going under the drill some 9,000 years ago. Of course, the equipment used back them was far more primitive than today’s advanced tools. However, the general aim and method was the same – drilling into the tooth to address decay and prevent a cavity from growing any bigger.

The first evidence of ancient peoples using dental techniques goes as far back as 7,000BC. Archaeologists studying the ancient Indus civilization, who settled the Indus Valley between modern-day India and Pakistan, found bow drills they believe were used for primitive dental surgery. With the string of the bow pulled taught, the drill bit would go into the affected tooth and, it was hoped, drain all the infection out. Of course, all this was done slowly and carefully, and all without any anaesthetics to ease the considerable pain.

It’s widely assumed that these first dentists were actually primitive jewellers. During the ancient Indus civilization, jewellery was very popular and bow drills were used to bore holes in beads to make necklaces and bracelets. Since they had the necessary equipment, these beadmakers would also be employed as makeshift dental surgeons, though their excellent hand-eye coordination and precise technique would likely have made up for their lack of medical knowledge. And, of course, if these beadmakers were the first dentists, then their assistants would have been the first dental assistants. After all, at least two other people would have been required to hold the patient down during the painful procedure.

This content was originally published here.

Pasco Man Accused of Practicing Dentistry Without License

WESLEY CHAPEL, Fla. — Pasco County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested Jose Mas-Fernandez, 33, for allegedly practicing dentistry without a license.

“Why people would go to someone like this, we don’t know. We can only speculate, but it is against the law. You have to have a license,” said PSO Community Relations Director Kevin Doll. “You have to be licensed by the state, and this individual obviously did not have that.” 

The arrest was the result of a joint investigation between the Sheriff’s Office and the Florida Department of Health.

Authorities said Mas-Fernandez offered to pull teeth for both an undercover detective and an undercover health department investigator. He reportedly offered to provide antibiotics for $150 and numbing medication for $20.

Inside Mas-Fernandez’s apartment, investigators found dental equipment and medication. Doll said he told detectives the supplies came from Cuba.

PSO’s documents state that after his arrest, Mas-Fernandez admitted to performing dental work, like teeth cleanings and extractions, out of his home. It’s unclear how many people he may have treated.

“Any medical doctor who’s not licensed working on your body can be very dangerous,” said Doll. “That’s why we suggest anybody who did see this individual to go to a real dentist and have their teeth checked out.”

Doll said Mas-Fernandez told detectives he worked as a dental assistant at Land O’ Lakes Dental Care. The office was closed Friday.

According to Brad Dalton, press secretary for the state health department, the DOH received 1,051 complaints of unlicensed activity during the fiscal year of 2018-2019. The department issued 593 cease-and-desist orders during that time.

Dalton said of those, 67 complaints and 36 cease and desist orders were related to the practice of dentistry. The DOH said Mas-Fernandez received one of those cease and desist orders.

The DOH reminds the public that being treated by an unlicensed medical professional could result in injury, disease, or death. License information for health care practitioners can be found at: www.flhealthsource.gov/ula.

This content was originally published here.

Dentistry Lacks Sufficient Research to Substantiate Many Procedures

The Trouble With Dentistry

by Dr. Joseph Mercola
Mercola.com

According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 92% of adults aged 20 to 64 have had cavities in their permanent teeth. Interestingly, Caucasian adults and those living in families with higher incomes have had more decay, or at least have been treated for more cavities. Adults in the same age range have an average of 3.28 decayed or missing permanent teeth.

While many believe water fluoridation is an effective way of preventing tooth decay, supporting facts are just not there. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) data reported by the Fluoride Action Network, the U.S., which provides fluoridated water to 74.6% of community water systems, has higher rates of tooth decay than many countries that do not fluoridate their water, including Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium and Sweden.

If fluoridation were effective, you would expect to see higher numbers of cavities in communities without fluoridated water and the number of cavities to decline when fluoride is introduced. Instead, demographic studies have demonstrated fluoridated water has little to do with cavity prevention.,,

Instead, caries often follow demineralization of the tooth triggered by acids formed during bacterial fermentation of dietary sugars. Just as depression is not triggered by a lack of Prozac, dental caries are not caused by a lack of fluoride — a neurotoxic compound that has no biological benefits. Excess dietary sugar is the most significant factor driving dental decay.

Dentistry Lacks Sufficient Research to Substantiate Many Procedures

The American Dental Association (ADA) claims the Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature (CDT) as their intellectual property. In 2000, the code was named as a HIPAA standard code set, and any electronic dental claim must use these procedural codes. According to the ADA, there are times when a code is not available and dentists are encouraged to request additions and revisions.

This process is different from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) based on data developed by WHO, which copyrights the information and publishes the classification. An adaptation of the classification for use in the U.S. is completed by National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and must conform to WHO conventions.

Oftentimes when expensive surgery or a regimen of pills is recommended, most seek a second opinion. However, the same is not true when you’re sitting in the dentist chair. A Cochrane review of dental studies finds many of the standard dental and cosmetic treatments are not substantiated by research.

For instance, they could not find enough evidence to support or oppose the surgical removal of asymptomatic impacted wisdom teeth, to prove if antibiotic prophylaxis is effective or ineffective in those at risk for bacterial endocarditis before a dental procedure, and only three trials were found analyzing the efficacy of filling cavities in primary teeth, none of which were conclusive.

In other words, much of the research in the field of dentistry is sadly lacking. While the recommendations may be appropriate, they may also not be, and many simply do not have adequate evidenced-based science to warrant their use.

As noted in recent article in The Atlantic, “[W]hat limited data we have don’t clearly indicate whether it’s better to repair a root-canaled tooth with a crown or a filling.” Derek Richards, director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Dentistry at the University of Dundee, commented on the gaping hole of evidence in the field of dentistry:

“The body of evidence for dentistry is disappointing. Dentists tend to want to treat or intervene. They are more akin to surgeons than they are to physicians. We suffer a little from that. Everybody keeps fiddling with stuff, trying out the newest thing, but they don’t test them properly in a good-quality trial.”

Anatomy of a Tooth

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, at least 40 million adults in the U.S. suffer from sensitive teeth. They describe the sensitivity as being caused by the movement of fluid within tiny tubes located in the dentin, or the layer of tissue found beneath the hard enamel. When the fluid reaches the nerve, it causes irritation and pain.

These tiny tubules are exposed when your enamel is worn down or the gums have receded. This increases your risk of experiencing pain while eating or drinking hot or cold foods. The Cleveland Clinic lists some factors that may lead to sensitivity, including brushing too hard, gum disease, cracked teeth, teeth grinding and acidic foods.

The tubules branch throughout the tooth and are different between peripheral and the inner aspects. The branching pattern reveals an intricate and profuse system crisscrossing the intertubular dentin.

Studies demonstrate anaerobic bacteria and gram positive rods, as well as a large number of bacterial species, may be found within this tubule system in those suffering periodontal disease. The researchers concluded:

“It seems clear that, in more than half of the infected roots, bacteria are present in the deep dentin close to the cementum and that anaerobic culturing of dentin is more sensitive than histology to detect these bacteria.”

Further research finds a necrotic dental pulp may develop unnoticed for years and the course of the disease is modulated by the variance of the microbiota in the root canal space and the capacity of the individual’s immune system.

Another study found the environment of the deep layers of the endodontic dental area is anaerobic, favoring the growth of anaerobes, including Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium.

Avoid Root Canals Whenever Possible

Root canals are not your only option. Teeth are similar to other systems in your body as they require blood supply, venous drainage and nerve innervations. Teeth that have undergone a root canal are dead and typically become a source of chronic bacterial toxicity in your body. In one study published in 2010, the authors wrote:

“Root canal therapy has been practiced ever since 1928 and the success rate has tremendously increased over the years owing to various advancements in the field. One main reason is the complete understanding of the microbiology involved in the endodontic pathology.”

If any other organ in your body lost blood supply and lymphatic drainage it would die. Your physician would recommend it being removed so necrosis and bacteria would not kill you. But dead teeth are commonly left in your mouth. Anaerobic bacteria thrive in your dentin tubes and the blood supply surrounding the dead teeth drains the toxicity, allowing it to spread throughout your body.

This toxicity may lead to a number of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cancer, irritable bowel disease and depression. Dr. George Meinig has a unique perspective on the underlying dangers of root canal therapy as he was one of the founding members of the American Association of Endodontists, root canal specialists.

When he wasn’t filling canals, he was teaching the technique to dentist across the country. After spending decades practicing endodontics, he retired and began pouring over the detailed research of Dr. Weston Price. He was shocked to find valid documentation of systemic illnesses resulting from the latent infections lingering in the filled canals.

The result was his book “Root Canal Cover Up.” In an interview with me, Meinig describes the result of Price’s research findings and credible reasons why you should avoid a root canal. Price’s work demonstrated that many who suffered chronic degenerative diseases could trace the origins to root canals.

The most frequently reported conditions were heart and circulatory diseases. The next most common diseases were of the joints and those of the brain and nervous system. Meinig assumes all root filled teeth harbor bacteria and other infective agents, but not everyone is made ill since those with strong immune systems may be able to prevent bacterial colonies from taking hold.

Oral Health Inextricably Linked to Your Overall Health

However, Meinig cautions that over time, most who have undergone a root canal seem to develop some type of systemic symptoms. If you choose to have a dead tooth removed, just pulling the tooth is not enough. Price found bacteria in tissue and bone adjacent to the tooth’s root. Consequently, Meinig developed a protocol he describes in his book to ensure no bacterial growth is left.

Historically, dentistry and medicine were separated. It’s unfortunate how many fail to fully appreciate the influence oral health has on overall health. The delicate balance of bacteria in your mouth is as important to your health as your gut microbiome.

Periodontal disease, which affects the soft tissue and bone, is triggered by an increase in Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacteria that impairs your immune response. Dental caries have been causally linked to Streptococcus mutans. In turn, your oral health impacts the rest of your body and they have a significant impact on your risk of disease.

For example, Type 2 diabetes and periodontal disease are strongly connected, as are cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease. Research has demonstrated failing to brush on a daily basis may increase your risk of dementia by 22 to 65%, compared to brushing three times a day, and good oral hygiene may lower your risk of pneumonia by 40%.

When the bacteria causing tooth decay and gum disease enter your circulatory system, your body increases the release of C-reactive protein known to lead to many chronic diseases. Therefore it’s only common sense to pay attention to your oral health, and develop good habits that support your oral microbiome.

Seek Out a Biological Dentist for Care

One step toward achieving good oral health is to seek out a biological dentist, also known as a holistic or environmental dentist. These doctors operate according to the belief system that your teeth are an integral part of your body and, hence, your overall health. They recognize oral and dental health have a major influence on disease and any medical treatment takes this into account.

While I recommend using a biological dentist for all your dental needs, if you’re considering the removal of dental amalgams, it’s absolutely essential. Most conventional dentists are unaware of the dangers involved and lack the experience to remove amalgam fillings without placing your health at risk in the process. Another strategy biological dentist use is to check the compatibility of dental materials with your body.

What’s in Your Silver Fillings?

The silver fillings in your mouth are dental amalgam. As noted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), dental amalgam has been used to fill cavities for more than 150 years in hundreds of millions of patients around the world.

Amalgam is a mixture of metals consisting of elemental mercury and a powdered alloy of silver, tin and copper, 50% of which is elemental mercury by weight. The FDA also admits amalgam fillings release low levels of mercury in vapor form that may be inhaled and absorbed in your lungs.

Mercury is a neurotoxin. How your health is affected will depend on the form of mercury, the amount in the exposure and the age at which you’re exposed. Additionally, how long the exposure lasts and your underlying health will determine symptoms you may experience.

Symptoms of prolonged exposure to elemental mercury may include emotional changes, insomnia, headaches and poor performance on mental function tests. In 2009, the FDA issued a final rule on dental amalgams reclassifying mercury from a class I (least risk) device to class II (more risk) and designated a special controls guidance document for dental amalgam.

The WHO found mercury exposure, even in small amounts, may trigger serious health concerns and can have toxic effects on lungs and kidneys, as well as the nervous, digestive and immune systems. It is considered one of the top 10 chemicals or groups of chemicals of major public health concern.

Daily Care May Protect Oral Health

As Meinig discussed in our interview, the only scientifically-proven way to prevent tooth decay is through nutrition. He related how in Price’s travels he found 14 cultural pockets of natives who had no access to “civilization” and ate no refined foods.

While their diets varied, they all ate whole, unrefined foods. Without access to tooth brushes, floss, fluoridated water or toothpaste, each group were almost all 100% free of caries.

For a discussion of how you may integrate holistic and preventive strategies, such as making your own toothpaste, flossing guidelines, and information on oil pulling and nutritional supplements to support your oral health, see my previous article, “Dental Dedication: Improve Your Oral Health.”

What’s Lurking in Your Silver Fillings?

It’s estimated that 75 percent of Americans are ignorant about that fact that amalgam fillings are actually 50 percent mercury, and this is no accident. The American Dental Association (ADA) popularized the deceptive term “silver fillings” so consumers would think amalgam is made mainly of silver when actually it has twice as much mercury as silver.

Mercury is an incredibly potent neurotoxin; it doesn’t take much to cause serious damage because it’s an absolute poison. If you were to take the amount of mercury in a typical thermometer and put it in a small lake, that lake would be closed down due to environmental hazards.

Yet, amounts much higher than that are readily put into your mouth if you receive a “silver” amalgam dental filling, as the majority of material in the filling is actually mercury. Download your free copy of “Measurably Misleading” and learn how the FDA and dental industry are misleading consumers and why that’s bad for American families and our planet.

Help Support Mercury-Free Dentistry

We believe in inspiring progress — and nowhere is the progress more evident than the work of Consumers for Dental Choice and its Campaign for Mercury-Free Dentistry. So consider donating your funds where you know it will get results.

Consumers for Dental Choice takes the Holistic Approach to Advocacy. You wouldn’t go to a traditional dentist who uses mercury amalgam fillings. So why would you go to a traditional activist to fight for mercury-free dentistry? That’s why so many people, including myself, support Consumers for Dental Choice’s holistic approach to advocacy.

Resources to Help You Find a Biological Dentist

The following organizations can help you to find a mercury-free, biological dentist:

Let’s Help Consumers for Dental Choice Get the Funding They Deserve

Consumers for Dental Choice and its leader Charlie Brown continue their full-court-press campaign to bring mercury-free dentistry to the U.S. and worldwide. If you wish to stay informed, I encourage you to follow them on Facebook; if you wish to stay informed by receiving their announcements, you can sign up by .

You can help stop dental mercury today! Please consider donating to Consumers for Dental Choice, a nonprofit organization dedicated to advocating mercury-free dentistry.

Read the full article at Mercola.com.

See Also:

Did Pennsylvania Mom Who Stood Up to Dental Bullying Uncover Massive Pediatric Dental Fraud Nationwide?

References

 National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Dental Caries in Adults 20 to 64

 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Water Fluoridation

 Fluoride Action Network, Tooth Decay in F versus NF Countries

 European Journal of Oral Science, 1996; 104(4):452

 Caries Research, 1993; 27: 201

 Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 2002; doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0528.2000.028005382.x

 World Health Organization, Fluoride in Drinking Water

 American Dental Association, Frequent Questions Regarding Dental Provision Codes

 American Dental Association, Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature

 World Health Organization, Classifications

 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ICD-10-CM

 Cochrane, Priority Reviews

 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, June 13, 2012

 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, October 9, 2013

 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, April 15, 2009

  The Atlantic, May 2019

 Academy of General Dentistry, Why Are My Teeth Sensitive?

 Cleveland Clinic Tooth Sensitivity: Possible Causes

 Archives of Dental Biology, 1996;41(5)

 Journal of Endodontics, 2001;27(2)

 Virulence, 2015;6(3)

 International Endodontic Journal, 1990;23(1)

 Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 2010;13(4)

 American Association of Endodontists, AAE History

 Frontiers in Microbiology, 2016;7:53

 Microbiology Reviews, 1986;50(4):353

 Diabetologia, 2012;55(1):21

 Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, 2010;14(3):148

 Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2012; doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.04064.x

 Annals of Periodontology, 2003;8(1):54

 Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Disease, 1993;25(2):207

 Dr. Weil, Holistic and Biological Dentistry

 U.S. Food and Drug Administration, About Dental Amalgam Fillings

 Environmental Protection Agency, Healthy Effects of Exposure to Mercury

This content was originally published here.

Quick Bytes: Space Grease, Horse Dentistry, and Lab-Grown Brains

Grease Me Up, Scotty

The Milky Way is one of the most magnificent sights in the universe. In addition to housing our very own solar system, the Milky Way is extremely large, as it has been discovered that an entire trip across the galaxy would take, at light speed, a total of 200,000 years. Well, that’s not the only recent discovery about the Milky Way as, much like a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese, it is large, beautiful, and covered in grease.

But how much of this “space grease” is out there gunking up the beauty of the universe? According to a recently published paper in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, it’s at the very least known that there’s enough grease that your spaceship would need a trip to the carwash.

Thankfully, due to the solar wind, experts don’t expect the grease to have any major effects on our own solar system. This is great news, as this solar system already has plenty enough grease in our restaurants, meals, and arteries.

Curing Colt Cavities

While we may always dread that occasional trip to the dentist, the practice of oral care has definitely improved over its long history. Dentistry itself dates back to 2600 BC, where the first-ever reference to dental work was made. However, we know what you’re thinking, “But when did horse dentistry get started?” Admit it, that’s exactly what you were thinking.

According to researchers, horse dentistry may have dated back to 3,200 years ago, when Mongolian pastoralists attempted to remove teeth from the animals in order to utilize metal bits. The researchers, who published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also made a connection between this discovery and the dawn of mounted battles and longer travel in certain Asian civilizations soon after.

You have to admit, it’s not often that you get the opportunity to read a story that teaches you the early history of equestrian dental hygiene. Well, now you have something to talk about at your next dinner party.

If I Could Only Grow a Brain…

To study the brains of Neanderthals, researchers have mainly focused on analyzing fossilized skulls to infer what they might have contained. However, a team at the University of California, San Diego is employing a new tactic: growing Neanderthal minibrains in a lab. At the UCSD “Imagination and Human Evolution” conference, geneticist Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., revealed that his team had used stem cells containing Neanderthal DNA and the genome editor CRISPR to create pea-sized lumps that could mimic the brain’s cortex.

For the experiment, the team focused on the protein-coding gene NOVA1, which likely helped produce more than 100 proteins in Neanderthal brains. It takes months to grow a minibrain from Neanderthal stem cells and the results have not yet been officially published. However, Muotri and his team think that the study could shed light on the links between the human and Neanderthal brain. Plus, many academics hope that this new brain-growing tactic could help Scarecrow achieve his dream of having a brain.

This content was originally published here.

Biological Dental Hygiene: A Whole Body Approach to Oral Health – International Academy of Biological Dentistry and Medicine

By Carol Wells, RDH Think of a visit with your usual dental hygienist, and you probably think: Yeah, I’ll get my teeth cleaned and a little lecture about flossing, and that’s it. Every appointment is just like another – though each patient’s dental needs are not. Fortunately, there are growing numbers of hygienists who think …

This content was originally published here.

Dentacoin Goes Beyond Dentistry: East Tremont Medical Center Joins the Dentacoin Partner Network

August 9th, 2018: Following this week’s signing of Dr. Gupta, inventor of PerioQ, we are happy to announce that East Tremont Medical Center, based in Bronx, NY, USA has begun accepting Dentacoin as a means Read more…

This content was originally published here.