Using AI to improve dentistry, VideaHealth gets a $5.4 million polish

Florian Hillen, the chief executive officer of a new startup called VideaHealth, first started researching the problems with dentistry about three years ago.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard educated researcher had been doing research in machine learning and image recognition for years and wanted to apply that research in a field that desperately needed the technology.

Dentistry, while an unlikely initial target, proved to be a market that the young entrepreneur could really sink his teeth into.

“Everyone goes to the dentist [and] in the dentist’s office, x-rays are the major diagnostic tool,” Hillen says. “But there is a lack of standard quality in dentistry. If you go to three different dentists you might get three different opinions.”

With VideaHealth (and competitors like Pearl) the machine learning technologies the company has developed can introduce a standard of care across dental practices, say Hillen. That’s especially attractive as dental businesses become rolled up into large service provider plays in much of the U.S.

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Image courtesy of VideaHealth

Dental practitioners also present a more receptive audience to the benefits of automation than some other medical health professionals (ahem… radiologists). Because dentists have more than one role in the clinic they can see enabling technologies like image recognition as something that will help their practices operate more efficiently rather than potentially put people out of a job.

“AI in radiology competes with the radiologist,” says Hillen. “In dentistry we support the dentist to detect diseases more reliably, more accurately, and earlier.”

The ability to see more patients and catch problems earlier without the need for more time consuming and invasive procedures for a dentist actually presents a better outcome for both practitioners and patients, Hillen says.

It’s been a year since Hillen launched the company and he’s already attracted investors including Zetta Venture Partners, Pillar and MIT’s Delta V, who invested in the company’s most recent $5.4 million seed financing.

Already the company has collaborations with dental clinics across the U.S. through partnerships with organizations like Heartland Dental, which operates over 950 clinics in the Midwest. The company has seven employees currently and will use its cash to hire broadly and for further research and development.

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Photo courtesy of VideaHealth

This content was originally published here.

Dr. Mario Paz: Orthodontist Shares Stress Reducing Tips for Those Grinding Teeth Over Pandemic Fears | eNewsChannels News

(MARINA DEL REY, Calif.) — NEWS: Throughout his 30-year career, Dr. Mario Paz is used to hearing reasons why patients grind their teeth at night, but now it’s about COVID-19. “Fears of the virus are creating new anxieties causing patients to clench their jaws for sustained period. This alters their bite causing pain,” he says.

According to Dr. Paz, “Stress is something we must attempt to manage, or it will manage us. Teeth grinding may lead to jaw pain and what is known as Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD), which may require braces to correct.”

Instead, Dr. Paz encourages people to focus on gratitude as a way of reducing their anxiety. “The first step is to be intentional, acknowledging stress takes a toll on the body and the mind. A powerful antidote is to cultivate an attitude of gratitude,” he advises.

According to a Harvard Mental Health Letter dated June 5, 2019, “In Praise of Gratitude,” expressing thanks can lead to improved health and greater happiness. The article gives six suggestions for cultivating gratitude, including writing a thank you note and jotting down three to five things you’re grateful for each week. “As you write, be specific and think about the sensations you felt when something good happened to you,” the article states.

Patients suffering symptoms due to excessive grinding should contact their dental professional after COVID-19 quarantines have been lifted. “Hopefully, we can all better manage stress from this virus in the days ahead,” says Dr. Paz.

About Dr. Mario Paz Orthodontics

Since 1990 when Dr. Paz opened his Beverly Hills office he has been as known as a pioneer in lingual braces technology, better known as “invisible” braces. Past president of the American Lingual Orthodontic Association (ALOA), Dr. Paz taught lingual braces at the UCLA Orthodontics School for two years and is a member of the European Society of Lingual Orthodontics, Sociedad Ibero-Americana de Ortodoncia Lingual, the American Association of Orthodontists, American Dental Association, the Western Los Angeles Dental Association and founding Member of the World Society of Lingual Orthodontics. Dr. Paz is now exclusively located in Marina Del Rey.

Learn more at: https://www.invisiblebraces.com/meet-dr-mario-paz/

For more information:
Dr. Mario Paz
310-822-4224
info@invisiblebraces.com

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